4 Comments

Morezmore – King and Jester (Part 2)

Continues from Part 1

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Heads

This is a clay “knob” on my head sculpting stand  – the beginning of the head, I already baked it.
Painted with Translucent Liquid Sculpey – to make clay stick.

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Made skulls.

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glass eyes 1:6 scale (4 mm).
Painted eye sockets with Translucent Liquid Sculpey
Also on the photos: wire cutters, cat tongue brush, ball stylus, eyebrow tweezers

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Set the eyes and baked.
Also on the photos: Deni convection oven , oven thermometer

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A few hours later – I have 2 heads.
Next – dressing – my favorite part.

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Powdered Wig (aka peruke, aka periwig)

I tried viscose roving for the first time. I thought the texture of viscose will look better than the Tibetan lamb that I usually use for hair.
It comes straight – as you see on the photo below. I needed to curl it and, after a few false starts, I figure out how to do it. But first – wig cap.

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This is not what it looks like, it is a rubber finger cot. I want to make the wig removable, so this rubber layer will help me.

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Cut a piece of tubular gauze – to make a wig cap.

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Painted (almost soaked) with Fabritac glue.

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First layer of viscose roving – thin, just to cover the scalp.
Pressed down in the center with the blunt side of the X-acto knife to make the parting.

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Separated viscose roving into tresses and rolled around a knitting needle. The last thin fibers at the end of the tress rolled several times keep it from unraveling, but at the beginning I was using a piece of thread to tie it.

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Now, hot surface. This is my iron rigged upside down – to make a hot surface. The highest temperature selected. Just put it on that surface for a few minutes. Experiment with thickness, length and the way you roll the roving around the needle – there are some options with different looks. It took 2 packs of this viscose roving to make the wig, some wasted because I used different heating methods until I got to the iron.

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Here is the King – painted and wigged.

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Next – Jester – painting the face and his fool’s cap.

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Painting – I will write a separate segment about that later.

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Hair and fool’s cap

For Jester I just need a little bit of hair, and I am going to use Tibetan lamb.
This is 4″x4″ square – too much.
Next photo – 2″x2″ square – too much.

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And here is a small sample that we give away with Tibetan lamb purchases – just right.
The color is Mocha Brown.

The fool’s cap is made out of stretch velvet
Half-googled, half-guessed the shape of the pattern and cut. At the end it turned out close enough, only a little bit of trimming was needed.

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The fool’s cap is ready. There is some thin wire inside that curls the ends.
The bells are made out of earring back stoppers.

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Pants
Here is a simple, yet effective and fast way to make a custom pants pattern for your puppet or doll.
1. Measure from the waist to the ankle.
2. Draw a vertical line.

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3. Measure the waist.
4. Draw 1/2 of that measurement on the pattern.

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5. Measure the depth of the seat.
6. Mark 1/2 of it on the pattern and draw a horizontal line.

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7. Measure the circumference of the thigh.
8. Mark that measurement on that horizontal line.

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9. Measure the circumference of the ankle.
10. Mark it on the bottom of the vertical line.

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11. Connect the dots. My doll has almost the same volume on the stomach and on the buttocks. You might need to add a little more curve on the buttocks area.
12. Here is one leg of the pants. The fabric is Harlequin stretch spandex. I used only a small part, about half of Fat Quarter.

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Sew. Here is a simple stitch that sews and finishes the edge at the same time.

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Try it on and sew/glue/tuck the excess fabric around the waist, if necessary.

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Shoes
I am remaking the shoes.
First – layer of Sculpey UltraLight.
Baked.
Cleared the clay out of joints so that it can be flexed.

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Same that it can be flexed backwards.
Bent so that there is an arch in the foot.

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These are King’s shoes (I am making 2 pairs of shoes at the same time).
King’s shoes have heels, made out of male-to-female Connectors M2x5mm

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Over the Sculpey UltraLight – Living doll.
Ultra light is rubbery and performs great around the joint – where I need it to flex, it does not crumble.
But is is not very easy to sculpt details out of it, it is too soft, so I am putting another layer – Living Doll.
Baked.

Carved the shape of the shoes.
Poulaines for Jester, high heels for King.

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Experimentally figured out the shape of the patterns (paper towels, not to waste the leather).
Glued the leather on the foot.

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Laced up with black rattail shoe lace cord.

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Made rows of tiny holes in the leather to imitate stitching.
Painted with Genesis paint (burnt umber) (rather rubbed some paint on leather with almost dry brush) to highlight the creases, stitching, to make a worn aged look.

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Play time!
Next – Jester’s tunic, belt, marotte (Jester’s stick) and other bells and whistles.

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Jacket is done, it is made out of green stretch velvet.
Step by step jacket pattern construction.
1. Measure length from shoulder to the bottom and mark it on the vertical line.

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2. Measure width from one sleeve to the other and mark it on the horizontal line.

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3. Measure the height of the sleeve opening and draw the chest horizontal line.

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4. Measure the circumference of the chest and mark 1/2 of that measurement on the chest horizontal line.

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5. Measure the circumference of the hips and mark 1/2 of that measurement on the bottom horizontal line.

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6. Connect the dots.
7. Measure the neck circumference and mark it (or just guess).
Here is the pattern of the back.

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The sleeves are of a “medieval design”, unusual cut. I constructed them wrong the first time and had to remake the pattern.
So no photos for the sleeves pattern at the moment, but I will take pictures when I make them for the King.

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8. Cut out the back pattern.
9. Tape it to the piece of fabric with removable scotch tape.

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10. Cut out, adding a little (2 mm) for the seams.

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Here is the back of the jacket.

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11. Fold the back pattern to make the front panel. Not quite at the middle – to allow some fabric for the front closure.

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12. Flip your folded pattern, tape the same way and cut out the second panel.
13. The red star is the collar.

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14. There is very little room for sewing, so I am just using Fabritac glue to finish the edges.

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The battle ground.
I changed my mind about the jingle bells and now they are made out of miniature brass grommets on hat pins, hooks bent with round nose pliers.

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Jacket with jingle bells, belt with miniature brass grommets, real buckle and with a leather coin pouch (heavy because it is full of steel hex nuts for the weight).

Show off time

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Are you checking out my butt?
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Jester has an experimental Humanly Posable SuperFlex armature, he is very lithe and graceful, able to assume more poses than the King (Humanly Posable Armature Standard). Jester can even roll into a ball.

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Continues on Part 3

Thank you!

4 comments on “Morezmore – King and Jester (Part 2)

  1. You are so very, very clever Natasha. What a work of Art those two faces are. From the skull to the faces complete with eyes. I’m almost overwhelmed at the work you have had to do to, of all the work involved and the knowledge you have accumulated to know let alone produce firstly these skulls and then onwards to add clay to make two such different people or men I guess I should say.
    Congratulations my dear Natasha, congratulations. They are absolutely amazing. I hope you like them and don’t decide you have to remake them both as they are so full of character.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Margot! 🙂 I really appreciate you noticing all this! Sculpting is never easy for me, but I am happy with these faces – they convey the personalities I was after 🙂 Thank you!

      Like

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